Self-Help leaflets for Downloading

Date: 28/05/2015

Good Sleep Guide

CSP Good Sleep Guide

Drivers Steer Clear of pain 

CSP Drive Clear of Pain

Fit to Work exercises and advice for the Office page 1

CSP Fit to Work page 1

 

Fit to Work exercises and advice for the Office page 2

CSP Fit to work page 2

Perfect Posture, three simple exercises to improve your posture 

CSP Perfect Posture

Students self help

Stress Down Leaflet proof (1).pdf with details

RSI

CSP Avoid RSI Proof (1).pdf with details

Neck pain the causes and how Physiotherapy can help

Date: 11/06/2014

Whether you have ongoing discomfort in your neck or are suddenly experiencing pain and stiffness, this summary will help you understand the causes and how physiotherapy can help.

Research suggests that in most cases it is best to keep normally active.

What is neck pain?

Neck pain is extremely common. Pain and stiffness can make it difficult to turn round – for example, when reversing a car. Symptoms may appear suddenly, as when someone wakes up with a stiff and painful neck, or gradually. The pain may be limited to the neck or may be accompanied by headaches and dizziness, or pain and pins and needles down the arm or hand.

What causes it?

Most neck pain does not have one simple cause, but is a result of a range of conditions that affect joints, muscles, tendons and the other tissues in the neck. Factors that can contribute include tension and sustained or repetitive activity, such as using the telephone a lot, sitting at computer screens or in front of the television, playing a musical instrument, and long-distance driving. If the neck has moved suddenly and unexpectedly (as in a car accident), the pain may be due to an injury, commonly known as whiplash.

How can physiotherapy help?

Physiotherapists are highly skilled at helping people with neck pain. The physiotherapist will examine your neck and explain how you can manage the pain, contribute to your own recovery and prevent the problem from recurring.

What will happen when I see a physiotherapist?

The physiotherapist will assess how your neck is working and affecting your life. They will ask lots of questions, watch your movements and feel your neck. Any visit is likely to include:

  • exercises to do at home
  • posture and lifestyle advice, and activities to avoid
  • relaxation techniques.

It may also include:

  • some manual therapy
  • applying heat or cold to the affected area
  • acupuncture, if the physiotherapist has additional training.

Meanwhile, how can I help myself?

For most types of neck pain rest does not help recovery, and it is better to keep moving. Tips include:

  • Keep as active as possible, changing positions regularly.
  • Take simple pain relief and any prescription medicines regularly. Follow the instructions on the packet, or ask your pharmacist.
  • Notice when your neck and shoulder muscles start to tense up, and learn a relaxation technique that works for you.
  • Consider using an electric hot pad to soothe the affected area.

Note: Go to the doctor if your pain is severe or is the result of an injury, or if it lasts more than a few days, spreads into your arm, or is accompanied by dizzy spells. They may prescribe medication to reduce the symptoms, or may refer you to a specialist or physiotherapist.

Where can I get more information?

The Neck Book By Gordon Waddell et al, published by The Stationery Office (2002). Booklet providing advice and information on how to cope with neck pain. The Neck Book, on Amazon.co.uk

Pain in the Neck – Online information produced by the Arthritis Research Campaign that explains how the neck works and the common causes of neck pain and related conditions.

Supplied by Mr R J D’Souza BPhil MCSP Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist. Telephone: 01872 241882 Reference: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

The content on this page is provided for general information purposes only and is not meant to replace a physiotherapy or medical consultation.

Neck pain PhysioFirst leaflet

Shoulder pain

Date: 16/10/2013

“Shoulder pain has many causes and can be difficult to treat. The best evidence available to date is encouraging but not compelling for a number of approaches: exercise and spinal manipulation.

On balance the treatment with the most favourable risk-benefit profile seems to be Physiotherapeutic exercise.”

Complementary Therapies for Pain Management. An Evidence-Based Approach. 2007. Editors: Edzard Ernst, Max Pittler and Barbara Wider.

Shoulder pain leaflet (PhysioFirst)

Management of Persistant Low Back Pain

Date: 10/05/2012

The Chartered Society of Physiotherapists have produced evidence based guidelines for the treatment of low back pain. They show that an individulised exercise programme from a Chartered Physiotherapist can reduce pain, improve function and improve psychological status.

“People with persistent LBP should be given the opportunity to participate in an exercise programme, in a form appropriate and acceptable to each individual, after Physiotherapy assessment”.

Back Pain – how Physiotherapy can help

Date: 09/05/2009

Whether back pain rules your life or you get an occasional twinge, this summary will help you understand how physiotherapy can help. Research shows that in most cases it is best to keep as normally active as possible.

What is back pain?

Almost everyone experiences back pain at some point in their life. The pain may occur suddenly and be gone in a couple of days, or it may last for weeks or even longer. Back pain usually gets better, but often recurs. The pain may be limited to the back itself, or it may spread to the groin, buttock, leg or foot on one or both sides. It may also cause pins and needles, numbness or burning sensations in one or both legs or feet.

What causes the problem?

Back pain can be the result of a range of conditions that affect muscles, tendons, ligaments, discs, nerves or other soft tissues or joints. Most back pain does not have one simple cause, but may be due to a range of factors, such as poor posture, repetitive activity and bad habits. Pain does not necessarily mean there is a serious problem.

How can physiotherapy help?

Physiotherapists are highly skilled at supporting people with back pain. The physiotherapist may offer manual therapy and will explain how you can manage the pain, contribute to your own recovery and prevent the problem from recurring. Research clearly shows that physical activity and exercise help, and a physiotherapist can provide an exercise programme based on your health, ability and fitness levels.

What will happen when I see a physiotherapist?

The physiotherapist will assess how your back is working and affecting your life, and the level of fitness you need for your usual activities. They will ask lots of questions, watch your movements and touch your back. They will also explain how to manage the pain, contribute to your own recovery and prevent the problem recurring. Your consultation is likely to include:

  • advice about exercises or physical activities that will help
  • posture and lifestyle advice and activities to avoid.

It may also include:

  • manual therapy, such as manipulation and massage for short-term pain relief
  • applying heat or cold to the affected area
  • acupuncture.

Meanwhile, how can I help myself? Contrary to popular belief, for most types of back pain rest does not help recovery. Tips include:

  • Keep as active as possible.
  • Take simple pain relief and any prescriptions regularly. Follow the instructions on the packet, or ask your pharmacist.
  • Get a copy of the Back Book (see ‘more information’ section below)

Most cases will settle in a few days. If you have not returned to your normal activities within six weeks, seek help. Note: These symptoms are very rare, but if you have severe pain that gets worse over several weeks, or if you are unwell with back pain or have had a recent serious fall or accident, go to the GP. See the GP straight away if you have:

  • difficulty passing or controlling urine
  • numbness around the back passage or genitals
  • numbness, pins and needles or weakness in both legs at the same time
  • unsteadiness on your feet.

Where can I get more information?

Back Book By Martin Roland et al, published by the Royal College of General Practitioners and the NHS Executive (2002). A classic source, which offers advice and exercises to tackle back pain. www.tsoshop.co.uk/bookstore.asp

Backcare – Independent national charity that helps people manage and prevent back pain. Produces a range of information and runs a helpline. Tel: 0845 130 2704 /  www.backcare.org.uk

Working Backs Scotland Public health campaign run by the Health Education Board for Scotland and the Health and Safety Executive. Tel: 0800 019 2211 /  www.workingbacksscotland/scot.nhs.uk

Supplied by Mr R J D’Souza BPhil MCSP Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist. Telephone: 01872 241882 Reference: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.

The content on this page is provided for general information purposes only and is not meant to replace a physiotherapy or medical consultation.

Whiplash the causes and how Physiotherapy can help

Date: 08/05/2009

If you are experiencing neck pain or stiffness following an injury or car accident, this summary will help you understand the causes and how physiotherapy can help.

Research suggests that in most cases it is best to keep normally active.

What is whiplash?

Whiplash is a common injury in which the soft tissues in the neck are sprained as a result of the body being moved backwards and forwards by an unexpected, strong impact. Symptoms often include stiffness in the neck and back of the head, and headaches. Some people also feel pain in the shoulder, between the shoulder blades, or temporary dizziness.

What causes it?

The ‘backwards and forwards’ movement that causes whiplash most commonly results from a road traffic collision, but can also be due to a fall, a blow to the head, or a strenuous physical activity such as diving, horse riding or rugby.

How can physiotherapy help?

Physiotherapists are highly skilled at supporting people with whiplash. They will explain how you can manage the pain and contribute to your own recovery.

What will happen when I see a physiotherapist?

The physiotherapist will assess how your head and neck are working and affecting your life. They will ask lots of questions, watch your movements and touch the affected area. Recommendations for treatment depend on the length of time that has passed since the injury. Any visit is likely to include:

  • exercises to do yourself
  • some manual therapy
  • advice on posture while sitting and sleeping, including practical advice on pillows
  • lifestyle advice, and activities to avoid.

It may also include:

  • applying heat or cold to the affected area
  • TENS – to help with any pain.

Meanwhile, how can I help myself?

  • During the first 24 hours after the accident, apply ice to the area (a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a teatowel is ideal), to reduce the inflammation.
  • Try to keep moving: a quick recovery is more likely if you maintain your normal activities
  • Seek early advice from a healthcare professional about how to keep active and to keep your neck moving.
  • Take simple regular pain relief, following the instructions on the packet. If you need something stronger, see your GP.
  • Set your car headrest at the right height for you, to reduce injury from any future collisions.

Note: The following symptoms are very rare, but contact the doctor or hospital immediately if:

  • you have experienced memory loss or unconsciousness since the incident
  • you have severe pain in the back of the head, or numbness and pins and needles in the arms or hands
  • your arms feel unusually heavy
  • you have dizziness, ringing in the ears or blurred vision that does not disappear quickly
  • the pain lasts more than four-to-six weeks.

Where can I get more information?

The Whiplash Book Booklet by Kim Burton et al, published by The Stationery Office (2002). A classic source, which offers advice and exercises to cope with whiplash injury. www.tsoshop.co.uk/bookstore.asp?Action=Book&ProductId=0117028622

Clinical Guidelines for the physiotherapy management of whiplash associated disorder. Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, London. Moore A et al. (2005)  www.csp.org.uk/uploads/documents/csp_whiplash_guideline.pdf

Supplied by Mr R J D’Souza BPhil MCSP Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist. Telephone: 01872 241882 Reference: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy

The content on this page is provided for general information purposes only and is not meant to replace a physiotherapy or medical consultation.

Chartered Society of Physiotherapists Students Survival Guide

Date: 16/05/2008

Students about to sit exams can reduce stress by using the CSP’s Student Survival Guide.

Preparation is everything. The CSP’s “stress busting” system – PREPARE – can help your mind and body get ready for exams, and boost your chances of academic success.

  • P planning
  • R Relaxation
  • E Exam revision technique
  • P Posture
  • A Activity
  • R Revision
  • E Eating a healthy varied diet

Parents can also get involved in helping their children beat stress and anxiety by seeking further advice from a local Chartered Physiotherapist who can provide additional relaxation techniques.

If you like a copy of the complete leaflet, we would be happy to email it to you.

Physiotherapy advice – a guide to safe gardening

Date: 10/05/2008

Safe Gardening – a guide from the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists (CSP)
Transmitted Sunday garden programme. 22th April, 2008

Host: Tim Hubbard

With the weather improving, thousands of green fingered fanatics will be gearing up to start work in their gardens.

But physiotherapists are warning that the garden can be a danger zone, with over a quarter of a million people requiring A&E treatment every year for injuries sustained while taking care of their lawns (1).

At this time of year Physiotherapists often see patients who have sustained injuries whilst gardening. The following tips are designed to reduce the risk of injury. Prevention is better than cure.

Over the winter we tend to be less active and therefore become unfit for the physical exertion required during gardening. Because the weather presents us with limited opportunities to garden, we tend to be over enthusiastic during the short periods of good weather.

CSP Guide to Safe Gardening Spinal clinical specialist physiotherapist Helen Welch has come up with 10 top tips to help enthusiastic gardeners avoid a trip to casualty this summer. She recommends that anyone with pre-existing injuries or joint conditions seeks professional advice before commencing a new activity:

Before you start a gardening job, assess the equipment and number of people needed. Often a job is larger than expected so underestimate your ability rather than taking on too much.

As with any exercise, remember to do some gentle stretches. Suitable exercises can be found in the publications section at www.csp.org.uk If you would like a copy of this leaflet, Reg would be happy to send it to you. Please send a stamped addressed envelope to D’Souza Clinic, 19 The Crescent, Truro, Cornwall. TR1 3ES

When moving heavy soil or cuttings, divide the load into smaller more manageable amounts. Use a wheelbarrow if possible and make several trips.

If potting containers or hanging baskets, place them on a raised surface to reduce bending.

If kneeling in the garden, place a small piece of foam or padding under the knees to limit the stress placed on the joints.

After periods of sustained or repetitive bending, such as digging or weeding, stand up and gently lean backwards 5 – 10 times. Take breaks often and drink plenty of water.

When lifting, keep the load close to your body. Bend from your knees (not from your back) and push up with your legs.

Move with your tools and use them correctly. When raking, digging or weeding, move to the areas you are tending instead of stretching out. When mowing the lawn, keep your body in line with the mower and keep an upright posture.

Beware of uneven steps, slippery paths and broken paving slabs. Wear suitable clothes and sturdy footwear.

Put tools away when you are finished with them. If left lying around, they can cause serious injuries. Be especially vigilant if there are children or pets in the garden.

Remember, if you sustain an injury and don’t see an improvement within 48 hours; seek a referral to a chartered physiotherapist from your GP. Alternatively, you can make an appointment to see a physiotherapist privately.

(1) Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents: Home and Leisure Accident Statistics 2002. National estimate for accidents in the garden or on the lawn – 299,136; accidents in yard, driveway or path – 127,408; accidents on the patio – 18,840.

We are pleased to help Rambert Dance Company

Date: 14/02/2008

During their recent tour in Cornwall the D’Souza Clinic was pleased to offer Physiotherapy treatment to some of the Rambert Dance Company. The D’Souza clinic has a long association with local dance groups, offering specialised Physiotherapy services. We are have experience of Sports and Dance injuries and prevention.

Best treatment for neck pain

Date: 26/01/2007

Active physiotherapy is a recognised, effective conventional therapy for neck pain.

To find out more about we recommend reading:

The Desktop Guide to Complementary and Alternative Medicine. An evidence-based approach.

Editors: Edzard Ernst, Max H Pittler, Barbara Wider. (2006) Mosby

We also recommend reading The Neck Book, published by TSO.

Whiplash Associated Disorder (WAD)

Date: 25/07/2005

“Physiotherapists and people with WAD should be aware that serious physical injury is rare and a good prognosis is likely. Recovery is improved by early return to normal pre-accident activities, exercise and a positive attitude. Once a serious injury has been excluded, over-medicalisation is detrimental.”

The D’Souza clinic fully supports the use of an evidence based approach in the treatment of neck pain, caused by injury such as a road traffic collisions. To find out more please contact us. Reference: Moore A, Jackson A, Hammersley S, Hill J, Mercer C, Smith C, Thompson J, Woby S, Hudson A(2005) Clinical guidelines for the Physiotherapy management of whiplash associated disorder. Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, London. We also recommend The Whiplash Book published by TSO.

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